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Study of balcony screen effectiveness to reduce heat gain in single-sided ventilation based high-rise residential buildings in Singapore

Tedjokoesoemo, Purnama Esa Dora (2014) Study of balcony screen effectiveness to reduce heat gain in single-sided ventilation based high-rise residential buildings in Singapore. In: 3th International Conference on Urban Heritage and Sustainable Infrastructure Development (UHSID) 14, 22-11-2014 - 22-11-2014, Semarang - Indonesia.

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Abstract

Heritage buildings serve their function as city landmarks and as a tangible witness of particular city history. The architecture of a city grow simultaneously and show their adaptation to their surroundings to meet people’s needs. Balcony and jalousie represent form of adaptation of Dutch Colonial style to tropical climates. Balcony is considered as one solution to reduce heat gain and yet it maximizes occupants’ living quality. Balcony provides access to outdoor view and relaxing function. Due to its functions, it is potential to adapt and re-use this architectural element in today’s façade design, in respect to energy efficiency and preserving the local design effort. But in some cases, balcony may not be able to hinder sunlight and heat it brings in higher angle position as in tropical sun position. To overcome this problem, movable screen device usage can be considered. This paper will look into the potential of balcony and screen device, in form of jalousie, effectiveness in buildings as passive design strategy to meet the balance of heat gain and daylight performance. This research conducted in simulation method using IES-VE 2012 as the main software.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Uncontrolled Keywords: balcony, energy efficient, daylight
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
N Fine Arts > NA Architecture
Divisions: Faculty of Art and Design > Interior Design Department
Depositing User: Admin
Date Deposited: 27 Nov 2014 18:26
Last Modified: 27 Nov 2014 18:26
URI: http://repository.petra.ac.id/id/eprint/16804

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